Panera, Miller Eatery, The Cleveland Clinic

Panera, Miller Eatery, The Cleveland Clinic

Intro

Panera, Miller Eatery, The Cleveland Clinic

In Collaboration with Perspectus Architects and the Cleveland Clinic, Philllips|Sekanick Architects, inc. worked closely with franchisee Covelli Enterprises to develop a unique restaurant for this world class medical facility.  With Perspectus Architects focusing on the front of house and Phillips|Sekanick on the back of house, the team was able to blend function and aesthetic together to create this unique and efficient, yet eye catching facility as part of the Miller Eatery.

Details

Panera, Miller Eatery, Cleveland Clinic

Challenge

The competing brand aesthetics of Panera Bread and The Cleveland Clinic needed to be carefully approached to ensure that each were adequately represented in a way that complimented the space.  The development of a multi-level operations area in the back of house also proved to be a major design challenge.

Solution

Respecting the design standards of The Cleveland Clinic, the Panera Bread facility was developed with clean lines and finishes to match those that occur throughout the facility. The design was enhanced with the brand standard art work and warm wood tones of the brand finish palette. To accommodate the multiple levels, the back of house kitchen operations were configured to permit ordering and food preparation on one level with seating on the other. This layout provided the franchisee and the Cleveland Clinic with a Panera facility that matches the hospital’s world class reputation.        

Salvators Italian Grille

Salvators Italian Grille

Intro

Salvatore’s Italian Grille

This popular local restaurant felt constrained and dated by a fixed seating arrangement and tired decor in their main dining room and a limited seating capacity in the bar room, especially at the bar counter itself.  With thoughtful planning and careful attention to the existing details Phillips|Sekanick Architects, inc. was able to provide a more open and flexible dining experience in both areas.

 

Details

Salvatore’s Italian Grille

Challenge

For the first phase of renovations the Owner of Salvatore’s Restaurant wanted a larger bar counter and more table seating in the bar room.  The existing L-shaped bar was truncated by a wall dividing the bar area from the banquet room at a 45-degree angle.  The Owner wanted to keep the existing bar and create a seamless addition to it for 360-degree serving.  Expanding the bar meant that the banquet room would no longer be large enough to serve banqueting functions, but it was still desired to create some special places for groups of approximately 20 people.  In phase two the focus was on opening up the main dining room, creating a larger waiting/pick-up area and giving the space a contemporary vibe.  All the seating in the dining room was fixed booth seating separated by several partial height walls which made the room feel smaller.  The waiting/pick-up area was small and not well defined.

 

Solution

In phase one the design team carefully measured the existing bar counter and equipment so that the expanded bar would match exactly, and all of the equipment would fit.  One private small group room was created adjacent to the bar room.  A second small group space was able to be created within the bar room by creating a raised platform for seating.  This allowed the flexibility of using this space for a small group or for general dining when no groups had reserved the space.  In phase two the design team studied the flow of the existing space to ascertain the best solution.  The existing airlock and entry were moved and reconfigured creating a better defined, larger waiting area and pick-up counter.  In the dining area all the partial height walls were removed, and a more flexible seating arrangement was designed.  Using a combination of loose tables, banquette seating and booths, the design team was able to create a layout that was not only open, but also afforded the ability to section parts of the space off for private parties.  Aesthetically, the space was contemporized by adding a fireplace, floating glass partitions and warm wood finishes.  By selecting two different complementing floor tiles, the design team used them in specific areas to define the space while leaving the dining area mostly open.  The reconfiguration of the space and selection of new materials allow for an efficient, beautiful space that is flexible, offering a variety of seating options for customers and a flexible table layout for dining groups of various sizes, while still remaining open for an enjoyable dining experience.

 

Good Intentions

Good Intentions

Intro

Good Intentions

Phillips|Sekanick Architects, inc. along with Contractor Bart Gilmore brought the farm-to-table restaurant and farmer’s market vision to life for Good Intentions.  The Owners of Good Intentions and the building Owner wanted to restore the historic Kinsman Town Hall and provide a must-see destination in Kinsman, Ohio.  They sought to maintain the historic charm of the building’s exterior and create an airy modern interior for the restaurant and market. 

Details

Good Intentions

Challenge

The historic Kinsman Town Hall was built in 1874 and had been neglected for many years. The roof and windows were in disrepair, the original stone foundation was crumbling and there was no floor, only dirt.  These conditions needed to be remedied in order to provide the services envisioned for Good Intentions.   

Solution

The design team at Phillips|Sekanick Architects, inc. worked with Bart Gilmore to devise a system to lift the enitre wooden structure, rebuild the foundations, provide a new floor, and reset the building on the new base.  A new roof sheltered the interior from the elements.  The existing exterior siding and trim was restored and new windows that mimic the size and shape of the originals were installed to complete the exterior.  Insidethe existing mezzanine was converted to a second floor suitable for dining and small group gatherings.  Light wall colors, thoughtfully placed lighting and a floating tread stair enhance the open airy modern aesthetic of the interior.    

Dunkin’ – Mahoning West

Dunkin’ – Mahoning West

Intro

Dunkin’ – Mahoning West

As part on an ongoing expansion effort, Phillips|Sekanick Architects, inc. was asked to convert an existing quick serve restaurant into a new prototype Dunkin’ facility.  Working closely with the Owner, our design team developed a plan to reconfigure the existing building to meet the needs of the Dunkin’ Brand.  Reworking the entire interior and exterior of the building, the building was successfully converted to the new design prototype.  

Details

Dunkin’ – Mahoning West

Challenge

The vacant shell of a former quick serve restaurant provided Dunkin’ with the perfect opportunity to expand operations in the Austintown area.  The building size and configuration did not meet the current Dunkin’ standards and the exterior required significant alterations to reshape the structure and to include the well known Dunkin’ elements. 

Solution

Working closely with Dunkin’ Brands and the franchisee, the building was altered to meet the service requirements of the franchise.  As small addition and extensive alterations to the exterior and interior provided the Owner with a building that exceeded Dunkin’ standards.  

Panera – Boardman

Panera – Boardman

Intro

Panera, Boardman

A first of its kind prototype, the Panera Bread Boardman was developed to create a pleasant and relaxed atmosphere for the customers of the fast casual restaurant.  Located in a active retail corridor, the design focused on an atmosphere that was open and inviting.  The interior areas are complimented by the outdoor dining areas and the drive-thru facilities. 

Details

Panera, Boardman

Challenge

The building parcel posed many challenges: the size was small, the topography sloped significantly, and storm water needed to be managed properly to prevent run-off to adjacent parcels.  Panera was using this location to experiment with a new interior and exterior aesthetic.  Input from Panera corporate headquarters, the franchisee, and Phillips|Sekanick Architects, inc. was all necessary to reach a final design solution.   

Solution

By situating the building toward the back of the site the design team was able to mitigate the building access challenges posed by the sloping site.  They were also able to capitalize on a shared access aisle with an adjacent plaza for drive-thru window access.  Utilization of an underground storm water retention system mitigated water flow to adjacent parcels and allowed for maximization of parking on this cramped site.  Through efficient use of the site Phillips|Sekanick Architects, inc. was able to maximize interior space for customers and designed a large open dining area for this first of its kind prototype restaurant.