Butler Museum

Butler Museum

Intro

Butler Museum | Medici

Phillips|Sekanick Architects were asked to work with local landscape designer Bart Gilmore, a former associate of Architect Thomas Schroth to create an addition to the Howland Branch of the Butler Museum of American Art.  The addition, designed to house a ceramic tile mural by French painter Pierre Soulages, mimicked the bold and austere modernist elements of the original design, while creating a new focal point within the facility.

Details

Butler Museum

Challenge

The Butler art curators desired a display mechanism that would allow Pierre Soulages’ mural to always be in view and allow additional art installations to be showcased within the space as well.  The ceramic tile mural weighed several hundred pounds and once installed would not be easily relocated.

Solution

Phillips|Sekanick Architects proposed a rotating wall for display of the Pierre Soulages ceramic tile mural.  Due to the weight of this art installation a ball bearing system with motor to rotate the wall was used to meet the client’s request for continual viewing of the art work.  The opposite side of the wall was now available for display of additional art pieces. This dynamic art installation was housed in a modernist addition which blended seamlessly with the aesthetic of the existing art museum.

Warren Amphitheatre

Warren Amphitheatre

Intro

Warren Amphitheatre

Over ten years in the planning stages and twenty years in concept, the Community Amphitheatre anchors the east end of the continually expanding city Riverwalk Project.  Seating approximately 2,500 people, the amphitheater is nestled into an existing hillside overlooking the Mahoning River. The amphitheatre is also surrounded by historical structures on the millionaires row, including the Perkins House which now serves as Warren City Hall, the Kinsman House, and the Warren First Presbyterian Church.  

Details

Warren Amphitheatre

Challenge

The natural topography of the site was well suited to creating the amphitheatre, but some adaptations and regrading was required.  Due to the close proximity to the Mahoning River it was important to locate key elements of the amphitheater above the 100-year flood plain.  Because the venue was open to the elements a durable material would be needed to form the seating. Wheelchair access was a significant concern on the sloping site.

Solution

With necessary regrading, the new concert venue took shape through the mixed use of lawn and terraced concrete.  The main connector for the lower level of the amphitheatre was designed to focus views on the steeple of a nearby historic church.  A system of ramps allowed wheelchair access to different levels of the venue. Perimeter walkways were designed to be wide enough to host food vendors.  Accessible seating and circulation along with convenient access and excellent sight-lines make this facility flexible for a wide variety of shows and programs.

Kinsman House

Kinsman House

Intro

Kinsman House

The Kinsman House alterations involved the addition of a new elevator to this historic 1832 Colonial Greek Revival structure. Adjacent to Warren Community Amphitheatre, the Kinsman House addition was designed to address accessibly needs within the building. Working closely with the State Historic Preservation Office, accessible elements were added to provide greater community access while protecting the historic appeal of the building.

Details

Kinsman House

Challenge

Because the building is listed on the National Historic Registry, all work that alters the appearance of the work must be approved through the U.S. Department of Interiors, National Parks Service.  The building needed an elevator to provide handicap access to all levels of the building. An exterior addition was found to be the only solution. The elevator addition needed to aesthetically complement the existing building, but the design needed to be easily identified as a modern addition.  Over the years the initial 1832 structure had been added on to several times with each addition built with floor levels lower than the previous addition. These additions were accessed by short flights of stairs or sometimes a single large step. This posed additional handicap accessibility issues.  The only restroom facilities were in the basement and did not meet current Code requirements. Finally, this stately building had been sadly neglected with water, birds and rodents all causing damage to the interior.

Solution

Phillips|Sekanick Architects was able to develop a modern elevator addition to the Greek Revival home which was connected with a narrow glass curtainwall system.  Use of porcelain tile exterior cladding which looked like limestone was a cost-effective way to maintain the limestone look without the expense or weight of real limestone.  Handicap accessibility within the house was addressed by use of ramps with a total of four ramps being added and one floor being raised. Creative reconfiguration of space allowed two new handicap accessible restrooms to be added on the first floor.  Room by room repairs were made to the plaster walls, hardwood floors, and historic wood trim. The white marble fireplace mantles were able to be cleaned and salvaged. Through our careful design efforts and close communication with state and local authorities, the house continues along the path to being restored to its full historic grandeur.

Blessed Sacrament School

Blessed Sacrament School

Intro

Blessed Sacrament School

Consolidation of various schools within the local parochial school district necessitated the addition of 11,000 square feet of classroom space to the Notre Dame School at Blessed Sacrament Parish.  School leadership selected Phillips|Sekanick Architects to design this much needed new elementary classroom space.

Details

Blessed Sacrament School

Challenge

The school leadership wanted the addition to blend aesthetically with the existing school building and the sanctuary.  The addition would create a new façade for the school and would have a significant presence on the adjacent secondary road.  The existing school facilities had been adapted for computer usage, but the new classrooms need to be planned for the current and future computer needs.  Construction schedule was also an important factor so that the classrooms would be ready for the new school year.

Solution

Phillips|Sekanick Architects designed a single-story masonry addition attached to the existing school, which utilized similar colors, textures, and design element found throughout the school and church facilities.  The addition houses seven classrooms, a computer lab and restroom facilities. All classrooms have been planned and prewired for the latest in computer and video teaching tools with the ability to upgrade systems in the future.  Construction was kept on schedule and construction activities wrapped-up in the summer which allowed full usage when classes started in the fall.

Warren G. Harding High School Stadium

Warren G. Harding High School Stadium

Intro

Warren G. Harding High School Stadium

Phillips|Sekanick Architects worked with the Warren City Schools to renovate and improve all parts of the New Deal-era Mollenkopf Stadium.  The project included replacement and improvement to the west side bleachers and restrooms, addition of a new press box, new aluminum bleachers at the east stands, and the installation of a new artificial turf playing surface.

Details

Warren G. Harding High School Stadium

Challenge

The existing stadium was not handicap accessible and did not have handicap accessible restroom facilities.  The school leadership desired a new artificial turf field but were concerned about the budget for such a renovation.

Solution

Phillips|Sekanick Architects was able to work with the school’s budget and accomplish the design goals.  Restroom renovation provided a cost-effective means to create handicap accessible restroom facilities without the expense of building a new restroom building.  Careful review of the artificial turf options and the associated costs of each system yielded a turf solution that met the needs of the school system.